• ../../../images/Article_pics/August2017/august31/settlerfestival/images/bakingtime.jpg

    Modern ovens were not available in 1867 so Alexis Stanbrook-McIntyre learns how to make gingerbread cookies in an outdoor oven. (Photo by Patiricia Leboeuf, Petawawa Post)

  • ../../../images/Article_pics/August2017/august31/settlerfestival/images/canoeman.jpg

    Dan Charbonneau creates replicas of voyageur canoes out of birch bark, spruce root and cedar. Though a human being wouldn't fit in his creations, they are built exactly as the larger ones. (Photo by Patiricia Leboeuf, Petawawa Post)

  • ../../../images/Article_pics/August2017/august31/settlerfestival/images/connorbennet.jpg

    Connor Bennett had a whole collection of antique cameras to show off and was happy to take an old-time photograph of visitors. (Photo by Patiricia Leboeuf, Petawawa Post)

  • ../../../images/Article_pics/August2017/august31/settlerfestival/images/girls.jpg

    Many of the volunteers that helped run the festival were youngsters, eager to learn about their ancestors and the past. Dressed up are from left Taytun Brand, Olivia Brown-Mckie and Jayden O'Regan.(Photo by Patiricia Leboeuf, Petawawa Post)

  • ../../../images/Article_pics/August2017/august31/settlerfestival/images/ironman.jpg

    Beth and Alan Bristow are ironmongers. These Canadian artisans skills are so refined that the Queen of England has one of their pieces. (Photo by Patiricia Leboeuf, Petawawa Post)

  • ../../../images/Article_pics/August2017/august31/settlerfestival/images/nick.jpg

    Nick Jahoor, 10, sharpens his pocket knife. The Swiss Army, originally called the Soldier Knife, was invented in 1884. (Photo by Patiricia Leboeuf, Petawawa Post)

  • ../../../images/Article_pics/August2017/august31/settlerfestival/images/rocks.jpg

    There was a rock show at the festival. Literally. Tom Kaddits happily answers any questions that Hannah Born and Paris Pearce had about his stones. (Photo by Patiricia Leboeuf, Petawawa Post)

  • ../../../images/Article_pics/August2017/august31/settlerfestival/images/weaving.jpg

    Using an old loom, Robert Hinchley hand weaves the town tartan. (Photo by Patiricia Leboeuf, Petawawa Post)


 

 


Celebrating of the Dominion of Canada Through Trades and Skills

By: Patricia Leboeuf

Posted on Thursday August 31, 2017


Celebrating the Dominion of Canada in 1867 was a time like no other. In the wake of Canada’s 150th anniversary, the Petawawa Heritage Village transformed its annual Settler Festival into something much grander: “Celebrating of the Dominion of Canada Through Trades and Skills.” Welcoming hundreds of people to its grounds, the three-day festival showcased the way people from the 19th century would have lived. Organizers also invited trappers, knife and tomahawk throwers, ironmongers, chainsaw carvers, blacksmiths, prospectors, apothecaries, loggers, spinners, weavers, bakers and more to demonstrate their skills. In addition to that, live entertainment, a petting zoo, face painting and vendors were also on-site. The Aug. 10-12 festival was also the perfect way to celebrate Canada’s birthday as well as the heritage of this nation.