Emergency Services Hockey Tournament honours fallen firefighter, raises $650 for bursary

Hockey team photo, players stand, kneel, lie on ice
Canadian Nuclear Laboratories Fire Department took home first place during the 8th annual Emergency Services Tournament in memory of Glenn Tabbert, held on Feb. 8 at the Pembroke Memorial Centre. (Photo by Patricia Leboeuf, Petawawa Post)

The memory of Glenn “Tabby” Tabbert is alive and well nearly nine years after his death through the 8th annual Emergency Services Tournament which bears his name.

National Defence Fire Service (NDFS) Fire Department firefighters and organizers Andrew Hubert and Craig Proulx have dedicated themselves to putting on this event in honour of Tabbert who died in a farming accident in July 2010.

This year, the tournament was held on Feb. 8 at the Pembroke Memorial Centre (PMC) and invited emergency service members of all stripes to participate. Together the six teams raised $650. This money will be put towards the Stacey Tabbert Bursary Fund in honour of Tabbert’s youngest daughter, who passed away in a traffic accident in October 2006.

The $500 award, paid through the Renfrew County Educational Enrichment Fund, is given to a Fellowes High School student who demonstrates similar positive attributes to its namesake. “After Glenn passed away, Craig and myself decided to take on that bursary on behalf of the fire hall,” said Hubert. “So we fund the bursary every year.”

Hubert and Proulx are grateful to see such generosity within the emergency services sphere and thank everyone who donated and has supported them over the years, helping keep the Tabbert legacy alive.

Hockey team photo, players stand, kneel, lie on ice
The NDFS Fire Department have had a hand in organizing the annual Emergency Services Tournament in memory of Glenn Tabbert since it first started. The tournament raised $650 for the Stacey Tabbert Bursary Fund. (Photo by Patricia Leboeuf, Petawawa Post)

Tabbert was a firefighter at Garrison Petawawa for 21 years and was well known for his skill on the ice, playing as often and on as many hockey teams as he was able. He coached soccer and minor hockey and was the president of the Oldtimers Hockey Club, where he was often seen carrying a briefcase with his hockey papers inside.

“Glenn loved hockey,” said Hubert. “He was heavily involved with his kids and the fire department and he ran ice time for the guys at the fire hall.”

But it wasn’t just his athletic abilities that made him a beloved figure. He was known as a proud, hardworking family man who had a wit so sharp that his teammates and friends gathered from near and far to hear his stories and jokes.

“We thought that this would be the best way to honour Glenn,” said Hubert.